Rock Bay postcard

View of Rock Bay showing some of the family homes at the logging camp.

Byles and Groves Logging

A high rigger climbing a spar tree in Call Inlet.

A truck loaded with big timber

Linda Workman standing on the exhaust pipe of a loaded logging truck.

Wharf at B.C. Forest Service Station

View of wharf at Thurston Bay at the B.C. Forest Service Station. The Forest Service boat B.C. Forester is tied up at the wharf.

Dot Logging Co. at Knight Inlet

Moving the steam donkey to a new setting at Lull Bay in Knight Inlet. Dot Logging Co. was owned by Clarence and Doug Boardman. This steam donkey (a 10 X12) was restored by the Museum at Campbell River and is now on display out front.

Wood chip burner at Beecher Lake Lumber Co.

Constructing the wood chip burner at Beecher Lake Lumber Co., which was owned and operated by the Baikie family of Campbell River, and was located in the Campbell River estuary area. The Beecher Lake Lumber Co. milled the wood that was logged by Baikie Bros. Logging.

Bloedel, Stewart and Welch in Menzie's Bay

The store and office at Menzie's Bay.

Brown and Kirkland crew and families at Elk Bay

Charles "Dutchie" Neuberg is seated on log at bottom right.

Powell River Co. in Kingcome Inlet

Interior of the blacksmith's shop at Powell River Co. operations at Kingcome Inlet.

Green Timbers Forestry Station in Surrey

Showing a portion of the transplant beds, containing the stock that would later be used to reforest areas of Thurlow Island.

Gildersleeve logging camp on King Island

G.H. 'Doc' Gildersleeve operated a small logging camp at various locations. According to Ken Drushka's book, Working in the Woods he established the first truck logging camps on the mid-coast. School teacher John Vogt(hired by Gildersleeve) when they were logging near King Island.

Campbell River Logger Sports

Cable splicing competition at annual logger sports held in Campbell River.

Beecher Lake Lumber sawmill operations

Beecher Lake Lumber Co., which was owned and operated by the Baikie family of Campbell River, was located in the Campbell River estuary area. The Beecher Lake Lumber Co. milled the wood that was logged by Baikie Bros. Logging.

Dot Logging Co. at Knight Inlet

Steve Nykolaichuk, Jack and Ken Clark (brothers) with a fourth unidentified man moving the donkey to a new setting at Lull Bay in Knight Inlet. Dot Logging Co. was operated by Clarence and Doug Boardman. This steam donkey (a 10 X12) was restored by the Museum at Campbell River and is now on...

International Timber Co. Camp 2 blacksmith shop

Gus Miller (on left), International Timber co. blacksmith, and his helper in the shop at Camp 2 near Campbell River.

Hastings Co. in Granite Bay

A Hastings outfit steam donkey in Granite Bay, Quadra Island. (Left to right): John Sandstrom, Emil Luoma, "Walleen", Charlie Hodall, ???, and Freddie Walker.

Woss Lake Loggers' Day

Armand Didier, winner of the Senior Tree Climbing event.

Brown and Kirkland operations at Elk Bay

Crew and family members at the Brown and Kirkland Elk Bay camp. Hemmi and Lempi Kilpelainen, Ada Mykannen, her son George, and David Mykannen.

M and M Logging Co.

Wharf and log booming area at M and M Camp at Forward Bay on Cracroft Island.

The Pigott family on a speeder at Rock Bay

Mr. Mennie at Hasting co. camp at Rock Bay

Wood chip burner at Beecher Lake Lumber Co.

Constructing the wood chip burner at Beecher Lake Lumber Co., which was owned and operated by the Baikie family of Campbell River, and was located in the Campbell River estuary area. The Beecher Lake Lumber Co. milled the wood that was logged by Baikie Bros. Logging.

Early logging truck on a fore-an-aft road

Morris Carlson (driver) in a hard-wheeled logging truck on a fore-an-aft logging road - part of the Byles and Groves operations at Port Neville.

Logging camp buildings near little Bear River

From back of photo: 'Along the road to the Jap Camp.'

Hastings Mill crew at Camp 0

Hastings Mill Camp O was run by Saul Reamy. The first camp "O" was established in the mid 1880's on Thurlow Island, then moved from there in 1893.